ROOTS & TRADITIONS

Rice was first brought to Italy by the Moors and Sarancens in Sicily around the 13th century. At first, Romans used rice for medicinal purposes. When populations in cities and demand for food increased, rice made its way to Piedmont, in northern Italy, where it was humid, the land was flat, and there was an abundance of water — making it ideal for growing rice.

The earliest Italian recipes with rice were sweet. It wasn’t until the 15th century, Maestro Martino published the Libro de Arte Coquinaria or “the art of cooking” which included one recipe with…

Italians see food as a source of pleasure and cultural identity. Food is about bringing people together and sharing hospitality. Eating is ingrained in daily life as a sacred social act and form of art. It is emphasized with simplicity, passion, and the utmost pleasure. Sophistication lies in the highest quality ingredients and attention to detail. Eating is a representation of respect to the land and local traditions. It is an elegant, no-fuss food culture.

Italians pride themselves on passing along traditions. They value things being done in a habitual way. Most families dine together on Sundays, and grandma, or…

2020 brought massive change on macro and micro levels. We saw destruction to the planet, separation in our communities, and tension in our homes. While some of these changes affected some more than others, most have been affected by an increase of technology. As our work, school and safest way of communication has shifted to digital, screen time has skyrocketed.

In December 2019, Zoom had 10 million daily participants. In March 2020, this number rose to 200 million, and rose to 300 million just one month later. Prior to the pandemic, we were spending as much as 12 hours in…

There is a time and place for everything. Nature ebbs and flows and with it, so do our tastes, preferences, spending habits, and morale. Great events come with great change. Covid-19 is such an event, unexpected, unknown, and wildly different from natural disasters or world wars that we have experienced in the past. The pandemic has created a tectonic shift in many industries.

While some fear the future, others are adapting to the realities of the present, understanding that in times of change opportunities arise and great innovations take place. It’s time to redesign on a macro and micro level…

ROOTS & TRADITIONS

In Sephardic Jewish cuisine, avgolemono was called agristada, or salsa blanca. Due to a strict kosher diet prohibiting dairy, agristarda grew out of necessity, utilizing eggs as a thickening agent. It was known as “the cornerstone of Sephartic cooking.” It was originally made with verjuice, pomegranate juice, or bitter orange juice. During the Middle Ages, the Sukkot festival popularized citrus cultivation and lemons became the standard acidic ingredient. When the Iberian Jews were expelled from Spain during the Inquisition, they brought agristada with them to Greece.

Today, avgolemono, or “egg-lemon” in Greek, is used to define a…

The ancient Greeks did everything in their power to separate themselves from hunter-gatherers and become a civilized race. Farming was seen as a way to classify their civilization while transforming nature. Bread, wine, and olive oil were the foundational ingredients cultivated from nature in ancient Greece, representing loyalty and simplicity.

  • Bread: More than any other product, bread represented civilization because humans were in control of the process. Ancient Greeks had 50–70 varieties of bread that were an important part of the diet, also used to celebrate special occasions. Bread is accompanied and served with most meals today.
  • Wine: Greeks drink…

It’s hard to get a toddler to eat clean — as in what’s on their plate and what flies off their plate. Many parents cringe at the thought of their children poking, prodding, mashing, and throwing their food around. I’ve seen kids smash a whole meal around the room, like a tornado came barreling through. No wonder why parents cringe.

Turns out all that mess might actually be good for us. Through play, kids ask questions and learn about the world. It encourages a place to be relaxed and have a bit of fun, which leads to food exploration and…

  1. Increased desire for connection. Prior to the pandemic, we loaded our schedules to the max and had little time to spend with those we love. The time apart has increased our desire to spend quality time with others. We are waiting for the days to commune safely. Connection and community are a necessary component to our well being. According to the Blue Zones, “Fostering close friendships is crucial to increasing longevity and maintaining your health. By creating a social “safety net,” you can protect yourself from depression, anxiety, and physical ailments to promote long, healthy life.”
  2. Increased cooking at home…

2020 was a year of massive change. From the pandemic to the political scene, we’ve been challenged at every level. Amidst all the social change, we’ve experienced massive environmental change. Here are a few stats on natural disasters this year:

  • Hurricane season had so many hurricanes, they used up the alphabetical list and moved to Greek letters for names.
  • Wildfires burned more than four million acres across California, this doubles the record of two million acres burned in 2018.
  • 2020 was a record breaking year, accounting for over 16 natural disasters and causing $1 billion in damages.

With that list…

It’s an interesting dichotomy — creating in the digital and living in the physical. In our modern world, many people struggle to get away from technology. We are glued to our screens and can’t get out. I find myself doing it. It’s hard not to. Even when we don’t succumb to social media or the news. Living outside the digital space is almost impossible.

Ones that don’t succumb are seen as outliers, maybe even heroes. They march to the beat of their own drum, living beyond hunched backs and tired eyes. They look people in the eye, not afraid of…

Nonna

We create unforgettable dining experiences in the comfort and safety of your own home. We bring the chefs to you. nonnaeats.com

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