We want to leave a better planet for our kids — a thriving place where they’re happy, healthy, and well. We are living in a time of constant change, a condition that translates into an immense opportunity for personal and global growth. There are many things open to change, waste being one of them.

One third of our food is wasted. American’s waste almost a pound of food per person per day. Our waste has increased 70% since the 1970’s. It’s thrown out in our homes, our grocery stores, our restaurants, and even our farms. On the farm level, perfectly…


ROOTS & TRADITIONS

Originally, miso was used as a salary for high-level bureaucrats. It was seen as a valuable commodity or luxurious item. Rather than being used as a seasoning, as it is today, it was eaten straight. It wasn’t until Buddhist monks brought suribachis mortars from China that miso was applied to the soup. Mortars were used to grind grain and allowed miso to be dissolved in water. Miso soup was not yet common but used as a field ration for soldiers during the Japanese civil wars.

During the Muromachi Period, the government incentivized the cultivation of soybean and…


Chinese Buddhism was introduced to Japan in the 6th century. In Buddhism, bowing was, and still is, a way of showing respect to a spiritual master. It wasn’t long before bowing was ingrained in the Japanese culture as a sign of respect, greeting, apology and gratitude. The bow is a small, yet widespread act that says a lot about the Japanese way of life.

Japanese culture is reserved and humble. There is a communal effort to maintain social harmony. Even the most hectic and crowded spaces in Japan are quiet. Things that disrupt the silence, like talking on the phone…


From water bottles to toothbrushes, plastic is all around us. It is so wide spread many of us don’t think twice about buying, using, or tossing it. In 1907, Leo Baekeland invented Bakelite, the first synthetic plastic derived from fossil fuels. While Baekeland’s invention is viewed as the birth of plastics, it wasn’t until the first World War that plastic was popularized and used in a variety of industries from auto cars to home insulation.

Compared to glass, ceramics or pewter, plastic prevented dents and breakage, and provided a longer shelf life. What we imagined a longer shelf life has…


ROOTS & TRADITIONS

Rice was first brought to Italy by the Moors and Sarancens in Sicily around the 13th century. At first, Romans used rice for medicinal purposes. When populations in cities and demand for food increased, rice made its way to Piedmont, in northern Italy, where it was humid, the land was flat, and there was an abundance of water — making it ideal for growing rice.

The earliest Italian recipes with rice were sweet. It wasn’t until the 15th century, Maestro Martino published the Libro de Arte Coquinaria or “the art of cooking” which included one recipe with…


Italians see food as a source of pleasure and cultural identity. Food is about bringing people together and sharing hospitality. Eating is ingrained in daily life as a sacred social act and form of art. It is emphasized with simplicity, passion, and the utmost pleasure. Sophistication lies in the highest quality ingredients and attention to detail. Eating is a representation of respect to the land and local traditions. It is an elegant, no-fuss food culture.

Italians pride themselves on passing along traditions. They value things being done in a habitual way. Most families dine together on Sundays, and grandma, or…


2020 brought massive change on macro and micro levels. We saw destruction to the planet, separation in our communities, and tension in our homes. While some of these changes affected some more than others, most have been affected by an increase of technology. As our work, school and safest way of communication has shifted to digital, screen time has skyrocketed.

In December 2019, Zoom had 10 million daily participants. In March 2020, this number rose to 200 million, and rose to 300 million just one month later. Prior to the pandemic, we were spending as much as 12 hours in…


There is a time and place for everything. Nature ebbs and flows and with it, so do our tastes, preferences, spending habits, and morale. Great events come with great change. Covid-19 is such an event, unexpected, unknown, and wildly different from natural disasters or world wars that we have experienced in the past. The pandemic has created a tectonic shift in many industries.

While some fear the future, others are adapting to the realities of the present, understanding that in times of change opportunities arise and great innovations take place. It’s time to redesign on a macro and micro level…


ROOTS & TRADITIONS

In Sephardic Jewish cuisine, avgolemono was called agristada, or salsa blanca. Due to a strict kosher diet prohibiting dairy, agristarda grew out of necessity, utilizing eggs as a thickening agent. It was known as “the cornerstone of Sephartic cooking.” It was originally made with verjuice, pomegranate juice, or bitter orange juice. During the Middle Ages, the Sukkot festival popularized citrus cultivation and lemons became the standard acidic ingredient. When the Iberian Jews were expelled from Spain during the Inquisition, they brought agristada with them to Greece.

Today, avgolemono, or “egg-lemon” in Greek, is used to define a…


The ancient Greeks did everything in their power to separate themselves from hunter-gatherers and become a civilized race. Farming was seen as a way to classify their civilization while transforming nature. Bread, wine, and olive oil were the foundational ingredients cultivated from nature in ancient Greece, representing loyalty and simplicity.

  • Bread: More than any other product, bread represented civilization because humans were in control of the process. Ancient Greeks had 50–70 varieties of bread that were an important part of the diet, also used to celebrate special occasions. Bread is accompanied and served with most meals today.
  • Wine: Greeks drink…

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